Methadone Frequently Asked Questions

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How do I know if Methadone is right for me?

Approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of opioid addiction, methadone has provided countless patients with relief from the painful symptoms of opioid withdrawal. In addition, methadone diminishes cravings for continued opioid use, which provides patients the opportunity to focus on their recovery in an unimpaired manner. When taken as prescribed, methadone is an extremely safe and effective treatment option for individuals who are battling an addiction to opioids. Use of this medication will not cause cognitive impairments, which allow patients the ability to effectively take part in daily activities such as work, driving, and school.

Jackson Comprehensive Treatment Center (CTC) offers several medications that can be incorporated into a patient’s treatment plan. For this reason, patients should work closely with their treatment provider in order to determine the appropriate medication based upon their individual treatment goals and requirements.

Can I become addicted to Methadone?

There is a potential for addiction when taking methadone. However, when taken as directed under the close supervision of a licensed medical professional, use of this medication is extremely safe. The team of medical experts at Jackson Comprehensive Treatment Center closely monitors the prescribing and administering of all medications in our center, which drastically decreases the risk for abuse and addiction.

Will Methadone show up on a drug screening?

Should an individual be required to complete a drug screen while taking methadone, he or she will not test positive as a specific test is required in order to detect methadone within the system. Patients who attempt to abuse opioids and other substances will cause a positive result on any drug screen given during treatment.

How long will I need to be on Methadone?

The use of methadone is safe for both short and long-term use. However, patients are not required to remain on this medication long-term unless advised by their treatment provider. By working closely with our medical staff, patients are able to determine the appropriate length of time for which methadone will benefit them and their treatment.

Does Methadone interact with other drugs or medications?

Since methadone can negatively interact with other prescriptions and over-the-counter medications, patients should notify their treatment provider of any other substances that they are taking prior to incorporating the use of methadone into their treatment. Use of opioids and/or alcohol should be avoided during the course of treatment due to the dangerous interactions that can occur when combined with methadone.

What if I no longer wish to take Methadone? Can I stop or switch to a different medication?

Patients who no longer wish to continue taking methadone should work closely with their treatment provider in order to safely taper off of their medication. Individuals who attempt to abruptly cease use of methadone place themselves at an increased risk for experiencing painful withdrawal symptoms. Once methadone is no longer in the system, patients can then transition onto a different medication or remain substance-free without the aid of a prescription. Our medical staff is readily available to assist patients in making these decisions based upon their treatment progress and requirements.

What is the cost for Methadone treatment?

Jackson CTC proudly offers patients the opportunity to develop a customized plan of treatment that meets their individual needs and goals. The medications that are prescribed, the form of payment that is provided, and the therapeutic interventions that are utilized will all impact a patient’s final cost of care.

To learn more about methadone or the cost of care based upon your individual treatment goals and requirements, please contact a member of our intake team today. Jackson Comprehensive Treatment Center is here to provide patients with the compassion, support, and treatment that is necessary in order to break free from the chains of opioid addiction.